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Items tagged with: MemeCulture


 

Elon Musk turned from transportation pioneer to obnoxious douchebag on the internet

Tesla/Space X/Boring Company guy, Elon Musk has apparently uploaded a SoundCloud track titled “RIP Harambe,” about the 17-year-old Western lowland gorilla who was shot to death at a Cincinnati zoo in 2016 after a three-year-old boy climb into his enclosure. No word yet on precisely what role Musk played in the creation of the track, beyond releasing it on his “failed […] record label.”
I didn't listen to the song and will never do so, neither in the near, nor in the far future. But for the record: Why am I finding this at all? I don't want to know about this, so why am I doomed to even find it in the widths of the internet?
#Musk #ElonMusk #Soundcloud #Harambe #News #Meme #Memes #MemeCulture #Cringe #IDontWantToLiveOnThisPlanetAnymore
Elon Musk, SoundCloud rapper


 

On the failed political discourse in the 21st century

Consider the immigration debate, which not at all debate but rather an article of secular dogma. Either you believe that “dey tuk er jerbz!” or you are in favor of “ayyymnasty!” Long gone is the middle ground of enforcing our laws and restoring legal pathways to citizenship; the argument is Manichean and total.
The question is what this legal path towards citizenship includes, the devil usually lies in the details. Otherwise, I agree with the author. The discourse lacks the decency, the arguments, and the common volume of noise. Especially the right screams more than it argues in its favour.
In both instances, opponents have no truck for actually weighing claims. In fact, those who are opposed to fanaticism in either instance are immediately slandered as either destroying the planet or destroying America. Careers can and have been ruined over denying climate change. Reject the hysteria over immigration, and watch in incredulity as the professional dema
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Instagram has got a conspiracy theory problem

Instagram is teeming with these conspiracy theories, viral misinformation, and extremist memes, all daisy-chained together via a network of accounts with incredible algorithmic reach and millions of collective followers—many of whom, like Alex, are very young. These accounts intersperse TikTok videos and nostalgia memes with anti-vaccination rhetoric, conspiracy theories about George Soros and the Clinton family, and jokes about killing women, Jews, Muslims, and liberals.
Soundsl ike 4chan, and the /pol/ subreddit. Nothing new, it all hast just moved on a different platform. I guess they are constantly wandering to spread as widely as possible in case they are removed from one.
In an email, an Instagram spokesperson told me that the company and its parent, Facebook, “continue to study trends in organized hate and hate speech and work with partners to better understand hate organizations as they evolve.” The spokesperson added, “We ban these organizations and i
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Why fascists have always been trolls


The Nazis were dedicated trolls who weaponized their insincerity to take advantage of liberal societies ill-equipped to confront them. This was not done just for political advantage—rather, the insincerity itself was a moral act, an expression of contempt for the weak.

The original Nazis were open about their intentions, but their strategic insincerity created a fog of doubt that allowed observers to avoid the obvious. In 1922, The New York Times infamously declared that many believed “Hitler’s anti-Semitism was not so genuine or violent as it sounded, and that he was merely using anti-Semitic propaganda as a bait to catch masses of followers and keep them aroused, enthusiastic, and in line for the time when his organization is perfected and sufficiently powerful to be employed effectively for political purposes.” In 1930, even after the Nazis had become the second-largest party in the German legislature, the Times assured its readers that “there is no present basis for assuming that th... show more


 

Ban on military rifles executed in New Zealand, subsequent to Christchurch mosque shooting


Jacinda Ardern said the ban goes into effect immediately and would be followed by legislation next month. New Zealand's citizens should make arrangements to turn in weapons banned under the new laws, Ardern told the nation in a live television announcement.

She said an amnesty will be put in place for weapons to be handed in by citizens. The New Zealand cabinet will also implement a buyback plan for banned weapons, and there will be "tightly regulated" exemptions for some owners such as hunters and farmers.

About 1.5 million firearms are owned – legally and illegally – by civilians in New Zealand, according to police data tracked by GunPolicy.org, a website run in conjunction with the University of Sydney. This equates to about 30 firearms per 100 people. In the United States, the rate is approximately 120 firearms per 100 people, according to the site.
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On the viral meme that distorts Quran verses (in relation to Rep. Ilhan Omar (D - MN))


The interpretations of nine verses from the Quran that the meme includes were made by one of the founders of the site, who describes himself as a freelance writer, not a religious scholar. In total, he had offered 36 reinterpretations of verses from the Quran. Several of them have been repeated in online publications since then, illustrating how misinformation persists for years and spreads online.

Muhammad, the founder of Islam, was persecuted, at least in part, for his religious message and had to flee his home in Mecca for the nearby town of Medina. There, he and his followers remained in conflict with the Meccans, and those struggles are referenced in the Quran.
#Meme #MemeCulture #Internet #FactCheck #Islamophobia #Islam #Religion #News #SpreadTheWord #Omar #IlhanOmar #US #USA
Meme Distorts Quran Verses


 

On the Christchurch shooting and its causes


The shooter says he carried out the attack for “my people,” because he believes that Muslim migration to European countries constitutes an “invasion” for which he wished to exact revenge. But he also included a number of ironic tropes intended to signal to his in-group and obscure what he was thinking to the out-group, only widening the cultural gulf between the two.

_The gleeful cruelty of the alt-right’s shposting in 2016, for instance, fooled mainstream journalists who couldn’t imagine people being glib about death threats or ethnostate advocacy. Their defensive and outraged reactions to something ostensibly ironic fueled the thing they were trying to stamp out. Shposting is ironic, vacuous. But it can also conceal something darker, as the apparent shooter’s 8chan post reveals: “Well lads, it’s time to stop sh**posting and time to make a real life effort post.”_

To say that it was meant ironic in any way, what those people are... show more


 

On the basis of internet culture that fuels hate crimes


The shooter’s manifesto and the livestream both contain a handful of references to internet-related things. Before he begins his drive to the mosque, the shooter says, “Subscribe to PewDiePie” — a phrase that recently became a meme via the YouTuber’s fans’ fervent efforts to preserve PewDiePie’s status as the channel with the most subscriptions on that platform. In the livestream recording, the shooter plays a piece of music known among channers as “Remove Kebab” (taken from an old Serbian propaganda video) while on his way to the mosque, and later plays a remix of “Grün ist Ünser Fallschirm,” a German paratrooper song preferred by channers. The one uniquely garish twist to the shooter’s livestream was his decision to write messages directly on his weapon, which is visible in the video at all times, similar to in a video game. It’s a tactic that feels cribbed from the popularity of streaming and “Let’s Plays.... show more